Meg Noble Peterson

Author of Madam, Have You Ever Really Been Happy? An Intimate Journey through Africa and Asia

MT. BAKER, THE DEFINING JEWEL OF THE CASCADES

P1100548No matter how many times I return to this majestic peak, I find subtle nuances I had overlooked before. Walking around our campsites, deep in the woods, I found hidden trails, shady alcoves blanketed in pine needles, varied ground cover, and ferns—some delicate, some enormous, each with its individual, intricate pattern. At night I would sit on the outskirts and watch the waning sun cast its brilliance through the branches, covering everything in a mystical glow. No photo can possibly substitute for nature’s real colors, but I tried.

(Click any photo to start slide show.)

The North Cascades are a wilderness defined by giant fir trees and native woody cousins whose lateral branches slope downwards, pulled by masses of bright green moss. Sometimes the burden is round, sometimes tubular, but always magical to me as I wander through the untouched forest. To be sure, some of the larger blow-downs are sliced in half by volunteer repair groups to let the hikers by, but most of the woods are left in a natural state.

My camp partner as usual was Jon Pollack, whom I met trekking on the Annapurna Circuit in Nepal in 1999. Our usual campsite in the Cascades over the years has been Silver Fir, which we visited in 2015 and 2013, but this year we chose one about 30 minutes off the beaten track deep in the wilderness, not far from Cascade Pass—Mineral Creek Campground—recommended by Steve Austin, the most charming, helpful camp host we’ve encountered. The fact that I offered my kingdom for a campsite might have helped. He was curious as to what my kingdom might comprise!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Near the campsite was a roaring river, one of several we would encounter over the next ten days.

P1100377And hovering above us was the ever-present Mt. Shuksun.  Here it is as seen from the south side.

Bears are a big topic in the Cascades. Here I am conversing with one at the North Cascades Visitors Center on our way to Washington Pass.

And, of course, we were surrounded by views on every side. Too bad I don’t know how to upload the video I took of the entire panorama. Still cameras just can’t do the job, although I tried!

The next ten days were filled with hikes, swimming in Baker Lake, and relaxing at our new campsite, Panorama Point. We were incredibly lucky to find the last unreserved site and, we think, the largest and the most beautiful. From now on we’re going to reserve a long way ahead of time! Fishing was a big sport at the lake, but it did nothing to disturb the peaceful area surrounding our favorite swimming hole.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Here are a few slide shows of our hikes. Pictures tell the story far better than my attempts to describe the Northwest wilderness—from old growth to temperate rain forest—mountain ridges too numerous to name, and the ever-present mountain streams and waterfalls, forded by bridges of varying quality.

Through Washington Pass to Diablo Lake trailhead, down to Ross Dam and Ross Lake.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Our campsite was on the unpaved road not far from Cascade Pass, which we had climbed a few years ago. This time we only went to the pass after getting a late start. It wasn’t difficult for me to forego going up and over Sahale Arm.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Our most strenuous hike was to Park Butte, reached by driving nine miles over an unpaved road. The trail was varied—winding switchbacks with lumber-reinforced banks (a bit too much exposure for me), trenches of white rocks that looked like abandoned river beds, steep rocky sections reminiscent of the White Mountains, and stretches of scree, making downhills slippery and challenging. And who could forget the variety of rustic bridges along the way? We reached a fire tower with panoramic views, but getting there really freaked me out, since we had to scale sheer rock to reach the steps. I think I’ve had it with fire towers!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

One final hurrah was the Anderson Butte trail.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A farewell gift from the master fire builder….P1100695

 

Previous

THOSE LAZY-HAZY-CRAZY DAYS OF SUMMER….

Next

THE UPSIDE OF TRAVEL

7 Comments

  1. Jon Pollack

    These may be the most beautiful pictures I have ever seen of any of our trips!

  2. Gwen Abel

    breathtaking, thanks for sharing Meg!

  3. Russell

    There’s just something about mountains. They’d just as soon kill us as put us in touch with the infinite. Good work.

  4. Ann Norris

    How beautiful!! Thanks for sharing all the wonders you see with the rest of us.
    What an amazing country we live in here in the USA. I never cease to marvel at its grandeur.

  5. Been there with our RV. Were skiing.
    Sherry

  6. Yana

    Great pix and comments, Meg. Felt like I was taking it all in right beside you (minus the bugs and blisters ;-). Have hIked some of that area years ago and glad to see it’s as gorgeous as ever!

  7. Pam

    I just did my first hike in the North Cascades near Mt. Baker a few weeks ago and it was divine! I’ve been such a creature of habit getting to know the Olympics so well. Now, a few more ideas for my next trip up north. Thanks Meg!

Comments are closed.

© 2017 Meg Noble Peterson & Site by Matt McDowell